Wednesday, January 29, 2014

What My New Geek Toy Tells Us About Happier Abroad

Xiongmao here.

I quit my job to go and see if I was actually Happier Abroad.  Well that's a long story, but when I went abroad I didn't forget any of my geek skills.

I've just built a new keyword research tool, so I thought I'd see what it could find out about Happier Abroad.

You can read the report for yourself here.
 
And if you want to try my tool yourself, then here's how to get started.

What does the tool do? Basically it retrieves the top X* number of search engine results for a particular keyword, puts all of the pages' HTML into a big melting pot, and extracts the most used words. This can be a great way to find important keywords in a particular niche.

*X is configurable.

So what did it find for the keyword Happier Abroad?

First up, the most common word relating to Happier Abroad is women, and that's followed in the #2 spot by dating.

So are women the #1 reason people go and live in other countries?

Let's look at some other themes I picked out of Happier Abroad-related keywords:

  • America: The good old US of A figures quite high up in the keywords report. I guess this is the most popular country in terms of people wanting to emigrate from it these days.
  • Russia and Ukraine: Apart from the USA, these are the most mentioned countries in the report.
  • Honourable mentions also go to the Philippines, Australia, Thailand and China. But they're quite far down the keyword popularity scale. Given how many Happier Abroaders go to these countries compared to Russia, I wonder if Winston is promoting Russian dating sites when he should be plugging Asian dating sites?
  • Kindle: This e-book related word features very highly. I wonder if Winston is writing Kindle books? If not then maybe he should be!
Further down the keyword hierarchy, things turn into the mass of different topics that the forum seems to cover, i.e. everything from politics, lunatics, science, immigration, food and loneliness.

And of course there are Winston's pet subjects, such as dogs, Taiwan, 12 reasons for this, and 7 changes of that.

I'm not sure where vegetarianism fits in with things though.

My tool also finds images related to keywords. Images in the Happier Abroad report include Winston with some cute ladies, some passports, a robot and many sexy beautiful foreign women.

The Forum report flopped hard, but maybe because Winston can't be bothered to SEO up his phpBB so my Forum Directory's data feed can't properly catalog the Happier Abroad forum . Still, I'm not bothered as I like the forum  look and feel exactly as it is.

I wonder if Winston will travel abroad this year? If he needs to increase the monetization of his sites in order to pay for flights, then maybe he needs to look at promoting phone cards, beefing up the content on expat living and getting into the travel dating niche.

Well I hope you found that some food for thought.

If you want to try the Niche Laboratory for yourself then download it at nichelaboratory.com.

I'll also take any suggestions for what to add to version 2.0 of Niche Laboratory - leave suggestions in the comments box below.

8 comments:

  1. broskiiFebruary 1, 2014 at 2:11 AM

    Winston Wu wants it in his ass mmm

    YUMYUM

    ReplyDelete
  2. My new toy is a dildo ;)

    ReplyDelete
  3. OBAMA4 President

    ReplyDelete
  4. Economics is a social science that studies how rational individuals, groups, and organizations (called economic actors, players, or agents), manage scarce resources which have alternative uses, to achieve desirable ends. On the one hand, the continuous interplay done by these economic actors in all markets set the prices for all goods and services which make the rational managing of scarce resources possible in the first place. And on the other hand the decisions taken by the same agents, while pursuing their own interest, determine the level of output (production), consumption, savings and investment in an economy, as well as the remuneration paid to the owners of labor,capital and land.
    The term economics comes from the Ancient Greek οἰκονομία (oikonomia, "management of a household, administration") from οἶκος (oikos, "house") and νόμος (nomos, "custom" or "law"), hence "rules of the house(hold)".[1] Political economy was the earlier name for the subject, but economists in the late 19th century suggested "economics" as a shorter term for "economic science" that also avoided a narrow political-interest connotation and as similar in form to "mathematics", "ethics", and so forth.[2]
    A focus of the subject is how economic agents behave or interact and how economies work. Consistent with this, a primary textbook distinction is between microeconomics and macroeconomics. Microeconomics examines the behavior of basic elements in the economy, including individual agents (such as households and firms or as buyers and sellers) and markets, and their interactions. Macroeconomics analyzes the entire economy and issues affecting it, including unemployment, inflation, economic growth, and monetary and fiscal policy.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Economics is a social science that studies how rational individuals, groups, and organizations (called economic actors, players, or agents), manage scarce resources which have alternative uses, to achieve desirable ends. On the one hand, the continuous interplay done by these economic actors in all markets set the prices for all goods and services which make the rational managing of scarce resources possible in the first place. And on the other hand the decisions taken by the same agents, while pursuing their own interest, determine the level of output (production), consumption, savings and investment in an economy, as well as the remuneration paid to the owners of labor,capital and land.
    The term economics comes from the Ancient Greek οἰκονομία (oikonomia, "management of a household, administration") from οἶκος (oikos, "house") and νόμος (nomos, "custom" or "law"), hence "rules of the house(hold)".[1] Political economy was the earlier name for the subject, but economists in the late 19th century suggested "economics" as a shorter term for "economic science" that also avoided a narrow political-interest connotation and as similar in form to "mathematics", "ethics", and so forth.[2]
    A focus of the subject is how economic agents behave or interact and how economies work. Consistent with this, a primary textbook distinction is between microeconomics and macroeconomics. Microeconomics examines the behavior of basic elements in the economy, including individual agents (such as households and firms or as buyers and sellers) and markets, and their interactions. Macroeconomics analyzes the entire economy and issues affecting it, including unemployment, inflation, economic growth, and monetary and fiscal policy.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Economics is a social science that studies how rational individuals, groups, and organizations (called economic actors, players, or agents), manage scarce resources which have alternative uses, to achieve desirable ends. On the one hand, the continuous interplay done by these economic actors in all markets set the prices for all goods and services which make the rational managing of scarce resources possible in the first place. And on the other hand the decisions taken by the same agents, while pursuing their own interest, determine the level of output (production), consumption, savings and investment in an economy, as well as the remuneration paid to the owners of labor,capital and land.
    The term economics comes from the Ancient Greek οἰκονομία (oikonomia, "management of a household, administration") from οἶκος (oikos, "house") and νόμος (nomos, "custom" or "law"), hence "rules of the house(hold)".[1] Political economy was the earlier name for the subject, but economists in the late 19th century suggested "economics" as a shorter term for "economic science" that also avoided a narrow political-interest connotation and as similar in form to "mathematics", "ethics", and so forth.[2]
    A focus of the subject is how economic agents behave or interact and how economies work. Consistent with this, a primary textbook distinction is between microeconomics and macroeconomics. Microeconomics examines the behavior of basic elements in the economy, including individual agents (such as households and firms or as buyers and sellers) and markets, and their interactions. Macroeconomics analyzes the entire economy and issues affecting it, including unemployment, inflation, economic growth, and monetary and fiscal policy.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Economics is a social science that studies how rational individuals, groups, and organizations (called economic actors, players, or agents), manage scarce resources which have alternative uses, to achieve desirable ends. On the one hand, the continuous interplay done by these economic actors in all markets set the prices for all goods and services which make the rational managing of scarce resources possible in the first place. And on the other hand the decisions taken by the same agents, while pursuing their own interest, determine the level of output (production), consumption, savings and investment in an economy, as well as the remuneration paid to the owners of labor,capital and land.
    The term economics comes from the Ancient Greek οἰκονομία (oikonomia, "management of a household, administration") from οἶκος (oikos, "house") and νόμος (nomos, "custom" or "law"), hence "rules of the house(hold)".[1] Political economy was the earlier name for the subject, but economists in the late 19th century suggested "economics" as a shorter term for "economic science" that also avoided a narrow political-interest connotation and as similar in form to "mathematics", "ethics", and so forth.[2]
    A focus of the subject is how economic agents behave or interact and how economies work. Consistent with this, a primary textbook distinction is between microeconomics and macroeconomics. Microeconomics examines the behavior of basic elements in the economy, including individual agents (such as households and firms or as buyers and sellers) and markets, and their interactions. Macroeconomics analyzes the entire economy and issues affecting it, including unemployment, inflation, economic growth, and monetary and fiscal policy.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Frequency of masturbation is determined by many factors, e.g., one's resistance to sexual tension, hormone levels influencing sexual arousal, sexual habits, peer influences, health and one's attitude to masturbation formed by culture; E. Heiby and J. Becker examined the latter.[28] Medical causes have also been associated with masturbation.[29][30][31]
    Different studies have found that masturbation is frequent in humans. Alfred Kinsey's 1950s studies on US population have shown that 92% of men and 62% of women have masturbated during their lifespan.[21] Similar results have been found in a 2007 British national probability survey. It was found that, between individuals aged 16 to 44, 95% of men and 71% of women masturbated at some point in their lives. 73% of men and 37% of women reported masturbating in the four weeks before their interview, while 53% of men and 18% of women reported masturbating in the previous seven days.[32]
    In 2009, the UK Government joined the Netherlands and other European nations in encouraging teens to masturbate at least daily. An orgasm was defined as a right in its health pamphlet. This was done in response to data and experience from the other EU member states to reduce teen pregnancy and STIs (STDs), and to promote healthy habits.[33]
    In the book Human Sexuality: Diversity in Contemporary America, by Strong, Devault and Sayad, the authors point out, "A baby boy may laugh in his crib while playing with his erect penis". "Baby girls sometimes move their bodies rhythmically, almost violently, appearing to experience orgasm." Italian gynecologists Giorgio Giorgi and Marco Siccardi observed via ultrasound a female fetus possibly masturbating and having what appeared to be an orgasm.[34]

    ReplyDelete

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